Ashwagandha Gummy Side Effects

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Ashwagandha, also known as “Indian ginseng,” is a powerful herb that has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine to reduce stress, improve brain function, and promote overall health and well-being.

But like any supplement, it’s important to be aware of the potential side effects before adding it to your daily routine.

In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the potential side effects of ashwagandha gummies, as well as special precautions and warnings to keep in mind.

We’ll also provide an infographic to help you choose the right ashwagandha supplement for your needs, and discuss recommended dosages and who should avoid taking it.

So whether you’re looking to reduce stress, improve focus, or boost your overall health, it’s important to be informed about the potential risks and benefits of ashwagandha gummies.

Special precautions and warnings

  • Ashwagandha Root Extract: Ashwagandha root extract is the primary ingredient found in ashwagandha supplements. It is important to note that not all ashwagandha supplements are created equal and it is important to make sure that the root extract is of high quality, standardized and from a reputable source
  • Taking Ashwagandha: Before taking ashwagandha supplements, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider, especially if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, have any medical conditions, or are taking any medications. Additionally, if you are taking other herbal supplements, it is important to be aware of any potential interactions.
  • Blood Pressure: Some research suggests that ashwagandha may lower blood pressure, so individuals with low blood pressure or taking blood pressure medication should use caution when taking ashwagandha supplements.
  • Ayurvedic Medicine: Ashwagandha is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine to reduce stress, improve brain function, and promote overall health and well-being. However, it is important to note that Ayurvedic medicine is not regulated in the same way as Western medicine and quality control can vary.
  • Chronic Stress: Ashwagandha is often used as a natural remedy for chronic stress, but it is important to note that it should not be used as a replacement for professional medical treatment.
  • Indian Ginseng: Ashwagandha is also known as “Indian ginseng” and is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine. However, it is not related to the ginseng plant and the effects and side effects may vary.
  • Blood Sugar: Some research suggests that ashwagandha may lower blood sugar levels, so individuals with diabetes should use caution when taking ashwagandha supplements.
  • Thyroid hormone concentrations: Ashwagandha may affect thyroid hormone concentrations, particularly in subclinical hypothyroid patients, so individuals with thyroid disorders should use caution when taking ashwagandha supplements.
  • Herbal Supplements: As with any herbal supplement, it is important to be aware of the potential side effects and to speak with a healthcare provider before taking ashwagandha supplements.
  • Side Effects of Ashwagandha: Some of the side effects associated with ashwagandha include stomach upset, diarrhea, and vomiting. Additionally, it may also cause drowsiness, so it’s important to avoid driving or operating heavy machinery after taking it.

What should I look for when choosing Ashwagandha?

When choosing an ashwagandha supplement, it’s important to look for a few key factors to ensure that you’re getting a high-quality product. Here’s an infographic that can guide you in your selection:

  • Standardization: Look for a supplement that is standardized to a specific amount of withanolides, the active compounds in ashwagandha. This will ensure that you’re getting a consistent and effective dose.
  • Certification: Choose a product that has been certified by a third-party organization, such as the USDA or NSF International. This ensures that the product has been tested for purity and potency.
  • Dosage: Check the recommended dosage on the label to ensure that you’re getting the right amount for your needs. Keep in mind that ashwagandha supplements come in different forms, such as capsules, tablets, and gummies, and each form will have a different dosage.
  • Ingredients: Avoid products that contain added fillers, binders, or artificial ingredients. Look for a product that contains only pure ashwagandha extract.
  • Manufacturer: Choose a reputable manufacturer with a good track record of producing high-quality supplements.

By keeping these factors in mind, you can be confident that you’re choosing a safe and effective ashwagandha supplement.

The recommended dosage of ashwagandha supplements can vary depending on the form of the supplement and the individual’s needs.

  • Capsules: The recommended dosage for ashwagandha capsules is typically between 300-500 mg, taken twice a day. However, some studies have used doses as high as 600 mg per day.
  • Tablets: The recommended dosage for ashwagandha tablets is typically between 500-1000 mg, taken once or twice a day.
  • Powders: The recommended dosage for ashwagandha powder is typically between 1-6 grams, taken once or twice a day.
  • Tinctures: The recommended dosage for ashwagandha tinctures is typically between 2-4 mL, taken twice a day.

It is important to note that individual response to ashwagandha supplements may vary, and it is best to speak with a healthcare provider to determine the appropriate dosage for your specific needs. It is always recommended to start with a lower dose and gradually increase as you monitor your body’s response.

Who Should Not Take Ashwagandha?

It is important to note that while ashwagandha can provide numerous health benefits, it may also pose certain risks for certain individuals. Therefore, before taking an ashwagandha supplement, it is important to speak with a healthcare professional about any potential side effects and contraindications.

  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not take ashwagandha supplements, as there is a potential risk of miscarriage or birth defects.
  • Additionally, the safety of ashwagandha supplements in children has not been established, so it should not be given to children without first consulting a doctor.
  • Individuals with chronic or acute health conditions such as diabetes, thyroid disorders, high blood pressure, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases should use caution when taking an ashwagandha supplement, as the herb may interact with certain medications and exacerbate existing conditions.
  • Those who are allergic to nightshade plants (like potatoes and tomatoes) may experience an allergic reaction to ashwagandha supplements as they contain compounds similar to those found in these plants.
  • In addition, individuals who have had previous adverse reactions to other herbs and herbal products should avoid taking ashwagandha supplements as there is a potential for cross-reactivity between different herbs.
  • Lastly, anyone who has had organ transplants or is on immunosuppressant drugs should avoid using ashwagandha due to its potential effect on the immune system. In some cases, long-term use may interfere with the effectiveness of medications used after organ transplantation.

Conclusion

Ashwagandha can provide numerous health benefits, but it is important to speak with a healthcare professional before taking an ashwagandha supplement.

Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not take this herb, as there may be risks of miscarriage or birth defects.

People with chronic or acute conditions like diabetes and heart disease should use caution when taking ashwagandha supplements as they may interact with medications.

And remember those who are allergic to nightshade plants or have had previous adverse reactions to other herbs should avoid using the supplement due to potential cross-reactivity between different herbs.

With careful consideration for individual needs and limitations, however, ashwagandha can be a safe and effective way to support overall wellbeing in many individuals.

About the Author

Jared Levenson is a former binge eating wrestler turned Zen Buddhist Monk, Internal Family Systems counselor and nutrition wellness coach. He's helped hundreds of people through universal meal principles and internal family systems to make peace with food, stop binge eating, and find true health and wholeness.

@jared_levenson

Watch "How To" free masterclass training To become Peaceful and free!

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