What supplements can cause a false positive for methamphetamemes?

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If you are taking supplements and are worried about a potential false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test, you are not alone.

This is a common concern for many people, as supplements can sometimes cause inaccurate test results.

In this blog post, we will discuss which supplements can potentially cause a false positive for meth and what you can do to avoid this issue.

What you need to know?

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There are certain supplements that can cause a false positive for meth on a drug test. These supplements include ephedra, pseudoephedrine, and phenylpropanolamine.

If you are taking any of these supplements, it is important to tell your doctor or the person administering the drug test so that they can take this into consideration.

In some cases, people have tested positive for meth even though they have never taken the drug before.

This is most likely due to cross-contamination of the supplement with meth or another substance.

If you are unsure whether or not your supplement has been contaminated, it is best to err on the side of caution and stop taking it until you can get clarity from a medical professional.

1. B-Complex Vitamins

B-complex vitamins are a group of water-soluble vitamins that play important roles in metabolism and energy production. B-complex vitamins can be found in a variety of foods, including meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, and leafy green vegetables. While B-complex vitamins are generally considered safe, they can cause a false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test.

2. Ephedra

Ephedra is an herb that has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine. The herb is typically used to treat respiratory problems such as asthma and bronchitis. Ephedra can also be found in some weight loss and energy supplements. While ephedra is generally considered safe, it can cause a false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test.

3. Pseudoephedrine

Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that is commonly used to treat nasal congestion and sinus infections. Pseudoephedrine can be found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold and allergy medications such as Sudafed. While pseudoephedrine is generally considered safe, it can cause a false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test.

4. Amantadine

Amantadine is an antiviral medication that is typically used to treat influenza A. Amantadine can also be found in some OTC cold medications. While amantadine is generally considered safe, it can cause a false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test.

5. Trimethoprim

Trimethoprim is an antibiotic that is typically used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). Trimethoprim can also be found in some OTC UTI medications. While trimethoprim is generally considered safe, it can cause a false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test.

6. Zoloft

Zoloft is a prescription antidepressant that is used to treat major depressive disorder and other mental health conditions. While Zoloft is generally considered safe, it can cause a false positive for methamphetamines on a drug test

What supplements can cause a false positive for amphetamines?

There are a number of supplements that can cause a false positive for amphetamines. One of the most common is ephedra, which is found in many over-the-counter weight loss and energy supplements.

Ephedrine, the active ingredient in ephedra, is structurally similar to amphetamines and can cause a false positive on drug tests. Other supplements that have been known to cause false positives include phenylpropanolamine, pseudoephedrine, and labetalol.

In rare cases, certain antidepressants and medications used to treat ADHD can also cause false positives for amphetamines.

If you are taking any of these medications or supplements, it is important to inform your physician or employer so that they can take this into account when interpreting drug test results.

Can supplements cause failed drug test?

It is not uncommon for people to take supplements to improve their health or to address a specific health concern. However, some supplements can cause failed drug tests.

This is because many supplements contain ingredients that are similar to those found in illegal drugs, and these ingredients can trigger a false positive on a drug test.

In some cases, taking a supplement may even be considered a form of doping, and athletes who fail drug tests due to supplements can be subject to disciplinary action.

Therefore, it is important to research the ingredients in any supplement before taking it, and to disclose all supplement use to anyone administering a drug test.

Otherwise, you may find yourself facing serious consequences.

What vitamins interfere with drug test?

While most vitamins will not directly interfere with a drug test, there are a few that can cause problems.

Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, can sometimes cause a false positive result for amphetamines.

Vitamin C can also cause a false positive for cocaine. In addition, a vitamin B supplement called choline has been known to cause false positives for marijuana on some drug tests.

While the chances of any of these vitamins causing a false positive are relatively low, it is always best to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any supplements.

What vitamins can cause a false positive drug test?

There are a few vitamins that can cause a false positive drug test. The most common offenders are vitamins B2 and B5, which can cause a false positive for THC.

Other vitamins that have been known to cause false positives include riboflavin and niacin.

However, it is important to remember that false positives are relatively rare. In most cases, a positive drug test is an accurate indicator of drug use.

If you are concerned about a false positive, you should speak to your doctor or the person who administered the test.

They will be able to give you more information about what can cause a false positive and how to interpret the results of your test.

What is a false positive drug test?

A false positive drug test is when a person tests positive for a substance that they have not consumed.

This can be due to cross-reactivity, where the test detects a similar but non-illicit substance, or due to contamination, where the sample is tainted with traces of the illicit substance.

While false positives are relatively rare, they can have serious consequences for the individual concerned.

In some cases, false positives can result in loss of employment or educational opportunities. In others, they may lead to false accusations of drug use and, in extreme cases, legal penalties.

If you believe that you have received a false positive drug test, it is important to speak to a medical professional as soon as possible.

They will be able to advise you on the best course of action and help you to clear your name.

How to dispute a false positive result?

If you believe that you have received a false positive result on a drug test, there are a few steps you can take to dispute the result.

First, it is important to remember that false positives can occur, so do not automatically assume that the test is wrong. However, if you know for sure that you have not used any drugs, then you may want to confirm this with another test.

A blood test or hair follicle test can be used to verify that your original results were inaccurate.

If possible, you should also request that the urine sample be retested using GC-MS or HPLC. By taking these steps, you can effectively dispute a false positive result.

12 substances that may cause a false positive

There are many substances that can cause a false positive on a drug test.

Among the most common are over-the-counter medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen, as well as prescription medications such as certain antidepressants and antibiotics.

Other common causes of false positives include food additives, supplements, and herbs such as poppy seed and garlic.

In some cases, even seemingly innocuous substances such as soap or lotion can cause a false positive.

While most false positives are not cause for concern, it is important to be aware of the possibility so that you can alert your healthcare provider if you are taking any of these substances.

Conclusion: 

If you are taking supplements, it is important to be aware that some of them can cause a false positive for meth on a drug test.

If you are concerned about this possibility, speak to your doctor or the person administering the drug test so that they can take this into consideration.

In some cases, cross-contamination of the supplement with meth or another substance may be to blame for the false positive.

If you are unsure whether or not your supplement has been contaminated, it is best to err on the side of caution and stop taking it until you can get clarity from a medical professional.

About the Author

Jared Levenson is a former binge eating wrestler turned Zen Buddhist Monk, Internal Family Systems counselor and nutrition wellness coach. He's helped hundreds of people through universal meal principles and internal family systems to make peace with food, stop binge eating, and find true health and wholeness.

@jared_levenson

Watch "How To" free masterclass training To become Peaceful and free!

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